New Graphic Novels 7/18

  • Green Arrow Vol1: The Death and Life of Oliver Queen DC Rebirth
  • Green Arrow Vol2: Island of Scars DC Rebirth
  • Justice League Vol1: Extinction Machines DC Rebirth
  • Batgirl Vol1: Beyond Burnside DC Rebirth
  • Fables Deluxe Edition: 5 by Bill Willingham
  • Beowulf by Santiago Garcia
  • Superwoman Rebirth #1: Who Killed Superwoman?
  • Superman Action Comics #1: Path of Doom
  • Flash Rebirth #1: Lightning Strikes Twice
  • Scooby Apocalypse
  • Injustice Gods Among Us vol 11
  • Star Wars Darth Vader
  • The Mighty Thor: Lords of Midgard Vol 2
  • Guardians of the Galaxy: Civil War II (Modern #13)
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Teen Review – Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

Reviewed by Emily Brenner

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a book from the perspective of an ordinary teenage boy, Greg Gaines. In a typical high school full of bullies and cliques, Greg figures the best way to get through his senior year is to keep an insanely low profile and to become acquaintances with just about everyone, making sure not just to stick to one friend group. However, Greg’s life changes entirely when his mom forces him to become friends with a girl who has cancer. This book, which has been said to be “the funniest book you’ll ever read about death,” combines realistic scenarios with relatable characters, making it easy for the readers to connect with the story. The author, Jesse Andrews, does an incredible job bringing humor, heart, and fun to an authentic story of a leukemia fighter. I would recommend this book because it’s a great book to make you laugh and the plot is very fast-paced and compelling. John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars would be a comparable novel to read if you enjoyed this book, as well as his An Abundance of Katherines. You may also enjoy If I Stay by Gayle Forman.

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New Nonfiction 7/13

  • Theft by Finding Diaries 1977-2002 by David Sedaris
  • Behaving Badly by Eden Collinsworth
  • The American Spirit by David McCullough
  • Star Trek Cats by Jenny Parks
  • Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss
  • Nevertheless by Alec Baldwin
  • The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell by W. Kamau Bell
  • Radical Hope: Letters of Love and Dissent in Dangerous Times by Carolina De Robertis
  • Incendiary by Michael Cannell
  • Called to Rise by David Brown
  • The Craving Mind by Judson Brewer
  • This Is Just My Face by Gabourey Sidibe
  • The Death of Expertise by Tom Nichols
  • Islamic Exceptionalism: How the Struggle Over Islam is Reshaping the World by Shadi Hamid
  • Barking Up the Wrong Tree by Eric Barker
  • Move Fast and Break Things by Jonathan Taplin
  • The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness by Paula Poundstone
  • Unfiltered by Lily Collins
  • The Collapse of Parenting by Leonard Sax
  • Dear Ijeawele by Chinamanda Adichie
  • The Civil War by Bill O’Reilly
  • Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil Degrasse Tyson
  • Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay
  • The Golden Secrets of Lettering by Martina Flor
  • Mike Torrez: A Baseball Biography by Jorge Iber
  • Ghost Sign: Poems from the White Buffalo by Al Ortolani
  • Wearing God by Lauren Winner
  • Left to Tell by Immaculee Ilibagiza
  • Concussion by Jeanne Laskas
  • 50 Events That Shaped American Indian History Volume 1 by Donna Martinez
  • 50 Events That Shaped American Indian History Volume 2 by Donna Martinez
  • Giant of the Senate by Al Franken
  • Love in a Time of Hate by Hanna Schott
  • The Close Encounters Man by Mark O’Connell
  • A Brief History of Sunday by Justo Gonzalez
  • The Book That Changed America by Randall Fuller
  • Night Thoughts by Wallace Shawn
  • The One Device by Brian Merchant
  • You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me by Sherman Alexie
  • Life-Changing Manga of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
  • Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood
  • Believe Me by Eddie Izzard
  • Literary Yarns by Cindy Wang
  • We Are Never Meeting in Real Life by Samantha Irby
  • How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way by Tim Seldon
  • Bugged by David MacNeal
  • Shattered by Jonathan Allen
  • Handpicked by Ingrid Carozzi
  • The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone by Olivia Laing
  • Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman by Anne Peterson
  • Policing the Black Man by Angela Davis
  • The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple by Jeff Guinn
  • Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World by Mitch Prinstein
  • Goodbye, things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki
  • Have Black Lives Ever Mattered? By Mumia Abu-Jamal
  • Sorry Not Sorry: Dreams, Mistakes, and Growing Up by Naya Rivera
  • I Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart
  • How to be a Muslim: An American Story by Haroon Moghul
  • Be Free or Die:The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery to Union Hero by Cate Lineberry
  • Where Now: New and Selected Poems by Laura Kasischke
  • Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley
  • American Eclipse: A Nation’s Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon and Win the Glory of the World by David Baron
  • The Hero’s Closet: Sewing for Cosplay and Costuming by Gillian Conahan
  • Bad Girls Throughout History by Ann Shen
  • You’re the Only One I Can Tell by Deborah Tannen
  • Democracy in Black by Eddie Glaude Jr.
  • The Women Who Flew for Hitler by Clare Mulley
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Teen Review – A Work in Progress

A Work in Progress by Connor Franta

Reviewed by Emily Brenner

A Work in Progress is a heartfelt memoir written by Connor Franta at twenty-two years old. As a YouTuber, Franta has faced a plethora of struggles such as friend drama, sexuality, labels, finding happiness, and finding his true identity in the midst of all the madness—fairly common struggles in today’s society and relatable to a range of readers. Throughout the book, Franta recalls specific memories and events from his past to tell his story and follows with pieces of advice and wisdom he’s learned through the years. His compelling story and the artistic nature of the book draws readers deeper into his story. As an avid photographer as well, Franta also includes multiple photographs from his childhood to tell the story, as well as more recent photographs he’s taken on his adventures across the country. I would recommend this book because the advice given is relative to today’s world and makes you question the way you live your life. Are you truly happy? Are you living to your highest potential? This biography changes your perspective on the world and your outlook on life overall. If you enjoy this book, I would recommend Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom, a novel full of great life advice and a similar feeling. Franta has also just released another book titled Note to Self, where he dives deeper into his individual struggles and how best to deal with them.

 

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