Teen Book Review: The Nine Lives Of Chloe King

The Nine Lives Of Chloe King

Liz Braswell/Celia Thomson

Book Reivew By Jasmine Roeder

 

I have wanted to read The Nine Lives Of Chloe King for a while now. I have watched the series but have not had the chance to read the book. I checked it out today, so I think I will start reading it soon. I think this book would be perfect for you if you like to read about supernatural and adventurous stories. The book is about an ordinary teenage girl whose name is Chloe King. She goes to school, hangs out with friends, and does all the usual things for a teenager. When she turns sixteen, she starts feeling like she isn’t normal and has rapid reflexes and visions. If that wasn’t weird enough, she even had claws, which showed her that she wasn’t an ordinary teenage girl. When she goes to school one day, she is still trying to wrap her head around the fact that she has powers and thinks she is all alone until she meets Jasmine and Alek. They know about her secret, and they have powers too. They help her train, tell her why she is like this, and even reveal that she has nine lives. She is then said that she is a protector and that people will be after her but will nine lives be enough for her? One day she goes from being a normal girl, and the next, she goes to fighting for her life while having nine lives. She meets more people who become her friends and needs to protect them without spilling everything. While dealing with this nine-lives drama, she is still trying to figure out what happened to her missing father. What will happen with all these secrets reveal themselves? You should definitely get it today if you are interested just by the review. This book includes all three parts of the series in one book. Below are the titles of each piece of her story in order if you get them separately.

The Fallen

The Stolen

The Chosen

 

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Teen Book Review: What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera

A Book Review by Mina Nguyen

What If It’s Us  is a fast-paced, coming-of-age, fated universe contemporary romance. When Arthur meets Ben at the post office, it’s an instant click. As they continue their conversation, Arthur deems that it’s fate: the universe wanted them to meet; however, their conversation ends as a proposal with a dance number splits them up. In order to find Ben again, Arthur tries everything: toying with the idea of putting up a Craigslist missed communication ad, going to the same post office again (multiple times), and major instagram stalking but nothing works until Arthur remembers the shirt Ben was wearing of a local cafe. In one last attempt to find Ben, Arthur puts up a poster of a picture of Ben at the cafe, hoping that Ben might see it and give the universe another chance at letting them meet up.

I got this book at the Andover Public Library Book Sale for a dollar, and it was a signed edition, and I’m so glad I picked it up. Honestly, I wasn’t expecting to love this book as much as I did. It was super fast-paced and really funny; I laughed a couple of times. Both these characters were extremely lovable and super relatable. I’m usually not a fan of the “fated love” trope since it’s almost always cheesy, but this book did a great job of making it youthful and hopeful. It was really well done. The romance was really fast, but it makes sense due to the book being revolved around high school relationships. While I’m not a big fan of the miscommunication trope, both characters were able to fix their mistakes quickly, without it being blown up. I also enjoyed the discussions of the pressure of being a first timer in romance and trying to plan everything perfectly down to the first date clothes. It was super relatable, and it showed how some dates/clothing options might not be perfect, but firsts in romance can still be enjoyable without it being exactly perfect.

Besides the romance, I also enjoyed the family and friend aspects of the book. A lot of LGBTQ+ books often discuss how some parents are non-accepting of their children’s identity which also happens in real life, more often than not, but I loved how this book had both sets of parents who were extremely accepting which is rarely seen in LGBTQ+ books. The friendship dynamics were super healthy and supporting. The side characters each had their own personalities and their own lives besides being there to move the main characters along. I also loved how this book discusses and normalizes not always excelling in school. A lot of books always have characters being the smartest person with the biggest aspirations, but I loved how this book had characters who weren’t always the best in school and characters who didn’t know what they wanted to do in the future, which is a more realistic description of high school teens. This book also did a great job of explaining the difficulties of trying to be a person of color but also white passing. This book had so many important elements for a coming-of-age book.

I definitely recommend this book to readers who enjoy a happier, bubblier read. It’s super fast-paced with a bunch of Broadway references. The romance was cute and the characters are worth investing in; they’re down-to-earth and very relatable. This is a great book for those who enjoy dual point of views and the divine universe/fated romance love without it being too cheesy.

 

Read-Alikes:

They Both Die at the End by Adam SilveraSimon vs. the Homo sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire SaenzI Kissed Shara Wheeler by Casey McQuistonThe Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School by Sonora Reyes

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Teen Book Review: The Cruel Prince by Holly Black

The Cruel Prince by Holly Black

A Book Review by Mina Nguyen

 

The Cruel Prince is a thrilling and magical, cutthroat enemies-to-lovers young adult fantasy. At the age of seven, Jude Duarte and her two other sister’s parents were murdered then taken to the High Court of Faerie to grow up. Ten years later, despite her mortality, Jude wants nothing else except to belong in Faerie, but most of the Fae despise humans, especially Cardan. Prince Cardan will do anything in his power to make her recognize her mortality and her inferiority, leading Jude to fight back harder to belong. As Jude continues to desperately prove her worth, she becomes more involved in the deceptions of Faerie while growing her talent for trickery and slaughter.

I love this series. I even own the Barnes & Nobles exclusive editions. I think I’ve read this entire series about four times. Even though the writing style in this series is very simplistic-almost juvenile- I have an attachment to the characters, especially Jude. I see this series marketed under the impression of enemies-to-lovers, which it definitely does have, but it’s a slow progression of their relationship, which progresses throughout all three books. I enjoyed the romance; I think it’s the most accurately written enemies-to-lovers where the two characters initially hate each other, and it’s very apparent. Romance is definitely a subplot in this series. While there is some romance within the series, a larger part of the series is about political motives. I’m a big fan of fantasy politics, and this book did a great job of showing the cutthroat side of gaining power. Aside from the politics, I also enjoyed the characters. I love Jude so much. She’s extremely fierce, hot-headed, and ambitious; I would almost put her under an anti-hero position due to the fact that she finds a way to remove anyone in her way. I don’t see a lot of women in fantasy books labeled as morally gray, but Jude is one I would place under that category. She’s probably one of the best female written characters in my opinion.

While I don’t think this series is for everyone, I think most people will enjoy it. The writing may be a bit simplistic, but if you’re a reader who enjoys romance but as a subplot, a big fantasy-political plotline, and values character development and relationships, you’ll most likely enjoy this book. It is definitely a young adult book based on the writing, but still enjoyable for all age groups. This book is not for everyone, but the characters alone make it a worthwhile read. I will never stop raving about Jude! I would’ve discussed more about what I loved about The Cruel Prince, but I don’t want to spoil any potential character/plot progression. If you’re in the mood for high-stake politics and an enemies-to-lovers romance, I definitely recommend this read. Also, if you’re still debating whether this book is worth the read, the fan art for this series is phenomenal and the fan art alone should convince you to pick up this book.

 

Read-Alikes:

Caraval by Stephanie Garber / The Inheritance Games by Jennifer Lynn Barnes / Serpent & Dove by Shelby Mahurin / These Violent Delights by Chloe Gong / Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

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Teen Book Review: You Deserve Each Other by Sarah Hogle

You Deserve Each Other by Sarah Hogle

A Book Review by Mina Nguyen

 

            You Deserve Each Other is a hilarious, lovers-to-enemies-to-lovers, second-chance contemporary romance. Naomi Westfield, the main character, has been dreading getting married to Nicholas Rose for the last couple of months now. What started off as a great relationship- full of butterflies and loving stares- has started to become sour, especially after Nicholas Rose seems to value his mom’s opinion over Naomi’s and especially when his mom gets flowers every week while Naomi gets nothing. Naomi thinks she’s doing great at pretending to be the perfect fiance, but apparently Nicholas has noticed her unenthusiastic nature for quite a while. Once Naomi becomes aware of this, Naomi devises a plan to get him to break off the marriage, so she isn’t stuck paying for the nonrefundable wedding bill, which starts a series of pranks and sabotage from both Naomi and Nicholas. As the wedding day looms closer, Naomi finds herself willing to give Nicholas a second chance since both have nothing to lose since they’re finally being themselves.

This and The People We Meet on Vacation are my favorite contemporary romances. Even though I would categorize this as a winter holiday read, I read it all year round. I think I’ve read this book five times, and I’ve loved it every single time. You Deserve Each Other had me laughing and giggling. The pranks were super funny and extremely entertaining to read. This was a funny book! The tension between the characters was also super good. I also enjoyed the pacing and the timeline of the book. Usually, I find that a lot of romances have characters say “I love you” way too soon, but this had enough of a relationship development that it felt natural; it didn’t feel rushed or out of nature for the characters since they had already been in a rocky relationship prior. I absolutely hate the miscommunication trope in books, but this did a great job of explaining the mindset where both characters were able to figure it out before it became a huge problem; they confronted each other before it got into a bigger issue than it needed to be. One of the best written miscommunication tropes because it was extremely realistic and not blown out of proportion. I loved how the characters recognized their own faults and were able to fix it without being passive aggressive.

I recommend this book to anyone because it’s that good of a read. I also think that non-romance readers would also enjoy it since it’s not too sappy and extremely funny. It’s definitely an easy read, and it does a great job of reforming the relationship between Naomi and Nicholas. You could tell there was a lot of character development for the both of them in order to relearn how to be themselves around their significant other. The ending was absolutely perfect; I will never stop raving about this book. This is definitely a great rom-com read if you’re in need of an extra boost of serotonin.

 

Read Alikes:

Unhoneymooners by Christina Lauren / The Hating Game by Sally Thorne / The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang / The Spanish Love Deception by Elena Armas / People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry / Beach Read by Emily Henry

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